Smudging involves burning of herbs to release their aromatic scent in order to purify an object, person or area.

Etymology

The word "smudge" comes from Middle English and refers to making a very smokey fire specifically to ward off insects1, from there it was applied (by English speakers) to the Native American purification practice of purification by smoke. Each tribe that practices purification by smoke has its own methods, traditions and name for the practice, applying the word "smudge" to all of them is an oversimplification and generalization. In fact, many spiritual traditions the world over use or have historically used purification by smoke, each in their own way and each have their own word for it, but we English speakers just call it all "smudging". The term has since been adopted by English-speaking New Age practitioners and has been adopted by many witchcraft traditions. The more proper term for a European-based practice would be fumigation, but since that brings to mind visions of exterminator vans, we don't like that term as much.

Process

Smudging is very simple to do with materials that are very easy to gather. The herbs or resins are simply burned, either in a bowl or another container, or bundled together to form a smudge stick, and the smoke from the herbs is wafted over an individual or object or throughout a space to purify it. The smoke may be directed toward to subject using a feather, a hand, or the practitioner's breath. Smudge sticks are made by bundling herbs together and binding them tightly with a string. Incense may also be used for smudging.

It is also interesting to note that most herbs used for smudging today actually have antiseptic qualities. That is to say, the burning herbs really do purify the air or bacteria and viruses!2 Many of these herbs were burned in sick rooms in ancient times for the same purpose. This practice, the purification of the air or a space by use of herbal smoke, is known as fumigation or suffumigation, though it is generally referred to as smudging today.

Please note that burning any herb can release toxic gases and inhaling any smoke is unhealthy. Smudging should only be done in a well-ventilated space or outdoors.

Smudging in America is traditionally done with tobacco, cedar, sweetgrass or sage but these herbs are particularly sacred within certain Native American traditions. European and Mediterranean traditions make use of a variety of herbs native to Europe and the Mediterranean including garden sage and thyme as well as resins such as frankincense and myrrh. I believe strongly that you should use what is readily available and grows nearby for any magical purpose for practical and ethical reasons. Things purchased from a distance could have been unsustainably sourced, wildcrafted from threatened populations, it can be expensive, and it's not in tune with the energy of the land where you are standing.

More Information Online

Some smudging herbs:

Agrimony - Agrimonia eupatoria

Bay Laurel - Laurus nobilis

Bistort - Polygonum bistorta, P. bistortoides

Chrysanthemum - Chrysanthemum spp

Hyssop - Hyssopus officinalis

Lavender - Lavandula spp

Marsh Mallow - Althea officinalis

Motherwort - Leonurus cardiaca

Mugwort - Artemisia vulgaris

Nicotiana - Nicotiana spp
Other Names Tobacco

Rosemary - Rosmarinus officinalis

Sage - Salvia spp
Zones: 5-8

St. John's Wort - Botanical Name Hypericum perforatum

Thyme - Thymus spp.


See Also


Do you have any questions or something to add?

Add a New Comment

You can Print this page for your Book of Shadows