Copper

Natural History

Copper is generally found in nugget form or sometimes in rough crystal-like clumps or strands. It is very malleable, so it is a popular metal to use for jewelry and tool-making, though it is too soft to use for most tools though it adds malleability to harder or more brittle metals creating alloys such as bronze and brass. Also precious metal alloys such as hepatizon and Shakudō have been used decoratively. Copper is an excellent conductor of energy such as heat and electricity and so has historically been used in both wiring and cookware. It is likewise an excellent conductor of magical/spiritual energy.

Copper salts give color to turquoise and azurite

Copper has natural antibacterial and antimicrobial properties making it useful for doorknobs, faucets and other places likely to collect bacteria to reduce the spread of disease.

When copper oxidizes, it develops a lovely green patina that protects the metal beneath from further degradation.

History and Folklore

Copper is important in the history of man as it is one of the first metals ever mined and worked by human hands over 10,000 years ago. It was also a primary component of the first metal alloys. Gold and iron may have been used even earlier than copper, but we learned to smelt copper before iron.

Copper is sacred to many of the love Goddesses. The ancient Romans called copper cyprium, as it was primarily mined in Cyprus, which also claims to be the birthplace of Aphrodite, Cypria being one of Her epithets. Later the name evolved to cuprum and this is where copper's symbol Cu originated.

Copper was also sacred to the Sun in Babylon as well as to indigenous people of the Pacific Northwest.

Seeds of the mimosa (Acacia dealbata) were set into copper rings to protect from all forms of negativity.

Copper Correspondences

Angel: Haniel
Gods/Goddesses: Shamash, Innana, Astarte, Ishtar, Aphrodite, Venus
Chakra: crown, heart, solar-plexus
Element: water
Astrological Sign: Taurus
Planet: Venus;
Sabbat: Midsummer or Litha;
Tree of Life: Netzach
Tarot: The Empress

Traditions

Bits of copper placed in the kitchen attract money.

Copper worn on the receiving side of the body will attract love, health, and prosperity.

Healing and Magickal Uses

Body: Many people believe that wearing a piece of copper jewelry on the affected part of the body will help rheumatism and arthritis. Any healing stone set in copper will have amplified affect.

Mind: Brings emotions into balance.

Magick: Healing work, fertility spells, prosperity spells, and spells to attract love.
Copper used in wands will help enhance and direct the energy that flows through the wands. You can enhance the energy of any magical stone by setting it in copper.

Care and Cleansing

Copper will eventually turn green if left to its own devices, but if you would like to return it to it's shiny copper color, it can be gently polished with baking soda. You can give it a good smudge and recharge it under the full moon before and between use.

Copper Toxicity

Copper ingested through contaminated water or foods stored or cooked in copper vessels can cause copperiedus poisoning. Free copper in the body has been linked to liver cirrhosis and Alzheimer's Disease. Elixirs using copper should be created using indirect methods only. A mask should be worn when cutting copper or sharpening copper tools. It is safe to handle, but you should wash your hands afterwards.

Note: Pennies have been widely used for various spells mostly for their copper content. However, in the U.S. in 1982, the content of copper in pennies went from 95 percent to a little over 2 percent.

See Also

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